What to Do When Your Child is Sick at Home

10/3/2021

It’s heartbreaking to see your child sick, whether it’s a small cough or a full-blown fever. It’s important that you, as a parent, take the time to care for them and ensure that they become healthy again. While most parents know how to care for their children it is always nice to have a refresher. Here are some tips that could be useful:

If your child can recuperate at home

Make sure they get plenty of rest and nourishment

Anyone who’s sick needs time to rest to get better. Make sure your child is getting as much sleep as they can, especially if their sickness seems severe. And don’t worry — there’s no such thing as “too much sleep” when you’re sick. Just make sure they wake up every now and then to hydrate and eat some nourishing food. In particular, they’ll need plenty of fluids, like water or tea. Diluted fruit juices are a good choice if your child doesn’t feel like having water. But steer clear of citrus fruit juices because these can irritate a sore throat.

Advise other people in the household to limit contact

To prevent the spread of the sickness, instruct your other family members to only interact with the sick individuals when necessary. This is especially the case if you have other young children in the house. And if you’re the primary caregiver, wash your hands frequently and monitor your health as well!

Keep them entertained

It wouldn’t be good to have your child worrying about their illness excessively. To ease their stress, distract them with fun games or light activities. Read them stories or play simple board games with them to help improve their mood. And if you have to step out for a quick errand, let them pass the time with educational apps that’ll help them learn new things and hone their fine motor skills. The less they worry about their illness, the better.

Keep an eye on their symptoms

Check in on your child and their status regularly. A cough, a sore throat, or a runny nose are telltale signs of colds, maybe even the flu. Other symptoms, like vomiting, diarrhea, or a fever, could be signs of other illnesses, such as a stomach infection. If their condition gets worse over time, it would be a good idea to contact your doctor.

If your child needs to see a medical professional

Call your doctor and plan the next steps

Before deciding to take your child to the hospital, make sure to consult your family physician first. Give them a call and tell them about your child’s symptoms. Your doctor should be able to advise you on what to do next.

For severe cases, see if you can contact a pediatric care specialist for your child’s diagnosis and treatment. They’ll be assisted by a team of healthcare professionals, including critical care nurses. Nurses who opt for these types of nursing careers are in charge of watching over patients in intensive care units, emergency departments, cardiac care units, and recovery rooms. Critical care nurses and other critical care specialists can keep careful watch over young patients with dire injuries or conditions, like asthma and pneumonia.

If there are any immediate care needs for your little one, seek these emergency healthcare services right away.

Have them wear a face mask on the trip

On the way to your child’s appointment, you don’t want to expose them to more harmful elements. So, make sure they’re wearing a face mask. It protects them from foreign elements while also preventing the spread of their sickness. Just make sure the mask is comfortable and stays in place. That way, the trip is easier for both you and your child.

Bring something that can keep them calm

Children might be uneasy at the idea of seeing a doctor, so make sure to bring something that’ll put them at ease — their favorite toy, a yummy snack, or a book to pass the time. To keep their spirits up, you can also promise to get them their favorite food or bring them to their favorite place once they’re well again. This gives them something to look forward to, which can lead to a faster recovery.

exclusively written for bimiboo.net

by Rachel Jims

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